Selected Works by the Loop Collective

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Feature

Main Space/Parkade/U-Hall

Runs from June 26, 2015 to July 25, 2015

Opening reception Friday June 26, at 8:00 PM

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Loop Collective

The Calgary Society of Independent Filmmakers and TRUCK Contemporary Art in Calgary are excited to present Selected Works by the Loop Collective in celebration of the Toronto-based experimental film collective’s 20th anniversary. The works in this program combine recent films from their members with older hidden gems, generating conversations between old and new, film and video, movement and stasis, purity and hybridity, nature and technology, matter and memory.

List of Films:
Izabella Pruska-Oldenhof, fugitive l(i)ght (2005), 9’32”, 16mm (digital version), sound.
Kelly Egan, ransom notes (2011), 5’, 35mm (digital version), sound. 
Colin Clark, The Trail Ridge is Closed (2014), 11'17", HD video, sound. 
Dan Browne, Alberta (2014), 2’50”, HD video, silent. 
Stephen Broomer, Dominion (2014), 8’, HD video, silent. 
Ty Tekatch, A Dream (2014), 1’15”, HD video, silent. 
Angela Joosse, Of Light From the Ground (2014), 2’54”, 16mm/DV, silent. 
Jocelyn Statia, Untitled (2015), 3’20”, HD video, silent. 
Ilana Gutman, The Changing Light (2003), 1’30”, DV, silent.
Shana MacDonald, Thaw (2006), 8’27”, 16mm/DV, silent.
Ajla Odobasic, Morning (2011), 4’13”, Super 8/DV, sound.
Erika Loic, Illuminated Text (2012), 13’25”, 16mm (digital version), sound. 

Izabella Pruska-Oldenhof, fugitive l(i)ght (2005), 9’32”, 16mm (digital version), sound.
 
This film explores the morph-like quality of the Serpentine Dance and its intricate play on the visible and the invisible, which extends to the larger context and legacy its originator, the American-born Loïe Fuller. Fugitive l(i)ght is composed of elaborately reworked found footage, originally captured by Thomas Edison and the Lumière brothers, of various renditions and imitations of Fuller’s Serpentine performances, where glimmers of her presence slip into the film by means of the artist’s absence; both Fuller’s and my momentary suspensions through my use of chance operation. These found films are woven into intricately reworked sequences using several computer programs, and following the poetic interpretations of several artists who experienced Fuller’s performances in person: texts of Mallarmé, lithographs of Toulouse-Lautrec, sketches of Whistler, and a futurist manifesto on dance by Marinetti. The music for this film was composed by Toronto-based composer Colin Clark, who reworked various LP recordings of Wagner’s “Die Walküre”; the music that often accompanied Fuller’s Serpentine performances. fugitive l(i)ght emphasizes rhythmic structures over and above representation, by drawing the viewer's gaze into a maze of multiple folds of continuously unfolding colour patterns.
 
 
Kelly Egan, ransom notes (2011), 5’, 35mm (digital version), sound. 
 
“We have your …” The ransom note, in our collective imagination, is an interesting entry point to the politics of ownership, freedom and exchange alue, made by transforming mass media (newspapers) content into a personal message – the re-appropriation of language and meaning through the act of collage. Ransom Notes explores this strange tension as a means of sorting out the filmmaker’s experience of the hijacking of her city during the Toronto G20 Summit and subsequent riots of June 2010. The film combines new and old media (film, newsprint, print-outs of twitter feeds), exploring social mobilization through mass media, culminating through the structure of a “waltz.” The soundtrack of the film is composed by placing letters, words and sentences directly on the optical soundtrack – in a sense the projector is “reading” the words, and the sound that you hear is the language produced by the cinematic machine. 
 
 
Colin Clark, The Trail Ridge is Closed (2014), 11'17", HD video, sound. 
 
A trip up the Trail Ridge Road to 11,000 feet in Rocky Mountain National Park, 2013. Part of an ongoing series of videos collected while traveling.
 
 
Dan Browne, Alberta (2014), 2’50”, HD video, silent. 
 
Journeys made in Banff and Jasper National Parks; paths cut through mountains that lead into the sky. “A journey without arrival in the great tradition of Canadian landscape travelogues.” – Richard Kerr
 
 
Stephen Broomer, Dominion (2014), 8’, HD video, silent. 
 
The thistle, shamrock, rose entwined, a vision in the longhouse, a dream in the wilderness.
 
 
 
Ty Tekatch, A Dream (2014), 1’15”, HD video, silent. 
 
A Dream is taken from a larger, interactive video installation called Terrors of the Breakfast Table. In Terrors of the Breakfast Table a character (a ten year old boy) experiences this dream sequence following the death of his father. After crafting this dream sequence I felt that it was compelling to watch on its own, outside of the context of the larger piece. Though normally accompanied by a soundtrack, here it is presented silently. 
 
 
Angela Joosse, Of Light From the Ground (2014), 2’54”, 16mm/DV, silent. 
 
A meditation on time, rhythm, and waves.
 
 
Jocelyn Statia, Untitled (2015), 3’20”, HD video, silent. 
 
Untitled is digitally compiled from photogram prints. Photograms of found matter were made using wet darkroom processing techniques. Further manipulation of prints were achieved using digital photographic techniques, producing in some instances Rorschach-like images. This work is inspired by research and musings about collections, memory, life and beauty.
 
 
Ilana Gutman, The Changing Light (2003), 1’30”, DV, silent.
 
One channel of a 6-channel projection, composed by Colin Clark and performed by the Loop Collective. The Cage-influenced composition allowed the filmmakers to create their channels based elements changing over time.
 
 
Shana MacDonald, Thaw (2006), 8’27”, 16mm/DV, silent.
thaw expresses the filmmaker’s frustration with images of femininity in Western visual culture. Using popular paintings from the history of European art, the film explores the feelings of panic and immobility that accompany the filmmaker’s exploration of her sense of self in the face of gendered cultural expectations. The film also presents a meditation on grief and the loss of MacDonald’s grandmother as a broader theme in the work. This is the final film in The Self-Portrait Series (2001-2006). 
 
 
Ajla Odobasic, Morning (2011), 4’13”, Super 8/DV, sound.
 
The oft-recounted tale, in film-poem form, of an immigrant’s identity, loss, and search for self in old places.
 
 
Erika Loic, Illuminated Text (2012), 13’25”, 16mm (digital version), sound. 
 
The processes of bookmaking and filmmaking are united in this film-riddle inspired by the late tenth-century Exeter Book and its alliterative Anglo-Saxon riddles.  Illuminated Text combines landscape footage, abstract colour, rotoscoped animation, and recreations of eighth-century manuscript decoration.

Loop Collective

The Loop Collective are a group of independent media artists formed in 1996 to develop a public platform integrating experimental film and video with other art forms. Over the past two decades, Loop has programmed and produced works for presentation through exhibitions and events in both traditional and non-traditional spaces. The collective's members are diverse and evolving; their practices spanning film, video, music, dance, photography, collage and textile arts. Our mission is to explore the roots of experimental film and video by creating a dialogue with other art media, and promote experimental film and video for critical engagement by cultivating relations among different artistic communities. Loop has presented gallery installations, screenings, and artist talks by renowned figures including Michael Snow, Carl Brown, R. Bruce Elder, Richard Kerr, Chris Welsby, Christian Lebrat, Carolee Schneemann, and Jósef Robakowski. Programmes of films by Loop members have screened at venues including The National Film Board of Canada, Ex-Centris (Montreal), WNDX Festival (Winnipeg), NASCAD (Halifax), Club SAW (Ottawa), Factory Media Center (Hamilton), Leeds International Film Festival (United Kingdom), and the 2010 Canadian Retrospective at EXiS Festival, (Diagonal Film Archive, Seoul, South Korea).

Stephen Broomer is a filmmaker and film preservationist. He holds a BFA in Film and Video Production, an MA in Film Studies, and a PhD in Communication & Culture, his dissertation a study of the origins of the Canadian avant-garde film. He has given public presentations of his film restoration work at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Canadian Film Institute, and his own films have screened at Views from the Avant-Garde, TIFF Wavelengths, and the Berlin Directors Lounge.
 
Dan Browne is a filmmaker, photographer and multimedia artist based in Toronto, Canada, whose works explore patterns, nature, and sensory perception through dense and kinetic audio-visual forms and have been presented at over fifty festivals and venues worldwide. His film memento mori (2012) received the Jury Prize for Best Canadian Work at WNDX Festival of Moving Image, First Prize (Experimental Category) at Athens International Film + Video Festival, and the Deluxe Cinematic Vision Award at Images Festival, and was presented as a live audio-visual performance at MUTEK. Dan is currently a PhD candidate in the York/Ryerson Joint Program in Communication and Culture, where his research focuses on relationships between technology, embodiment and art.
 
Colin Clark is a composer and video artist in Toronto. His music has been performed by Arraymusic, the neither/nor collective, Lions, Fleischmop, and other ensembles. Colin's soundtracks for experimental films by Izabella Pruska-Oldenhof and R. Bruce Elder have been shown at film festivals and cinematheques internationally. His own digital videos explore duration, landscape, and personal image processing algorithms. Colin is the creator of Flocking, a web-based framework for creative music composition, sound synthesis, and data sonification. With Adam Tindale, he recently established the Inclusive Electronic Music Ensemble at OCAD University. He is the Lead Software Architect at OCAD University's Inclusive Design Research Centre and has worked in the field of inclusive software design for eighteen years.
Kelly Egan is a filmmaker, composer, archivist, and assistant professor of Visual and Media Studies at Trent University. Her academic and artistic interests explore the intersections of art and technology, focusing specifically on how contemporary artists engage with and re-imagine “dead media.” 
 
Ilana Gutman is a Toronto-based educator, mother, sometime film/video maker and collaborative artist-member of the Loop Collective. Her work has shown nationally and internationally, including Canada, Korea, Colombia, and Argentina. She is presently a professor at Humber College in Toronto Canada. Ilana is interested in exploring the relationship of the female body to modernity, technology, religion and spirituality in the form of moving collage.
 
Angela Joosse makes films, videos, and site-specific works. She has been a member of the Loop Collective since 2006. Angela is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.
 
Erika Loic may be represented as a series of university degrees, when words are limited: BFA, Film Studies (Ryerson); MA, Communication and Culture (York/Ryerson); MA, History of Art (University of Toronto); PhD (in progress), History of Art and Architecture (Harvard). Other nouns may help: attentiveness, animation, and obstinacy.
 
Shana MacDonald is a Toronto-based filmmaker and installation artist. Her films have been screened within Canada and across South America, Europe and Asia. Her most recent work, Dear Ruth, a mixed-media collaboration with Angela Joosse, was commissioned as part of The Leona Drive Project. Her work is concerned with tactility, embodiment, medium specificity and the re-aestheticization of abandoned objects and artifacts.
 
Ajla Odobasic is a multimedia artist, soundtrack composer, and filmmaker. Her films with Loop have screened at the Leeds International Film Festival, the Alucine Media Festival, EXiS Festival (Seoul), and WNDX Festival in Winnipeg.
 
Izabella Pruska-Oldenhof is a Toronto-based experimental filmmaker and scholar. She is a graduate of the Media Arts Programme at Ryerson University (B.A.A) and the Communication and Culture Programme at York University (M.A. and Ph.D.). Her films have screened at festivals, cinematheques, galleries and museums in Canada and abroad, and have received several awards. She is an Assistant Professor at Ryerson University and teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in the Faculty of Communication and Design. Her interests focus on the feminine aesthetics, specifically in avant-garde cinema and body art. Izabella is one of the founding members of the Loop Collective.
 
Jocelyn Statia pursues an art & research practice that explores elements of everyday life through the examination of objects, cultural discourses and technical processes. Her work has been exhibited within Canada at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Factory Hamilton Media Arts, Ministry of Casual Living, Perry Sound Station Gallery and Richmond Art Gallery. Her films have been screened at group shows and festivals. She currently lives in British Columbia.
 
Tyler Tekatch is a Hamilton-born, Canadian artist whose work in film, video and interactive media explores the nature of dreams, perception and the religious imagination. His work has been screened nationally at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, the TIFF Bell Lightbox, the National Film Board, WNDX Festival and internationally at festivals in Seoul and London. His work is driven by the conviction that the creative nature of perception and dreams reveal everyday existence to be deeply unknowable. 

loopcollective.com